Women’s health topics attract a lot of media attention — whether it’s new research about menopause, a question about the safety of breast implants or a contraceptive, or a political attack on critical women’s health services. The NWHN is a trusted source for explaining women’s perspectives on these, and many other, health developments.

Click here to view our 2017 media highlights.

Highlights – 2018

PR Newswire

March 2018 | NWHN’s fibroids fact sheets makes an appearance in another story about AbbVie’s recent study about elagolix, a possible treatment for endometriosis and fibroids.


March 2018 | AbbVie, a research-based biopharmaceutical company conducts a study on possible endometriosis and fibroid treatment elagolix, and Equities.com references NWHN’s fibroids fact sheet.


March 2018 | NWHN’s hysterectomy fact sheet gets another shout out from Vogue writer Elizabeth Varnell, who recounts Lena Dunham’s own experience.

The Hamilton Spectator

February 2018 | Liam Stack’s piece about hysterectomies makes another appearance in The Hamilton Spectator, including another shout out for NWHN’s hysterectomy fact sheet.


February 2018 | Women’sHealth.com talks about Lena Dunham’s experience with her hysterectomy, referencing NWHN’s statistics about removal of the uterus or ovaries at a young age.


February 2018 | Another study conducted about elagolix’s effect on fibroids is published by AbbVie, and NWHN’s fibroids fact sheet makes an appearance.

MD Magazine

February 2018 | Matt Hoffman of MD Magazine references NWHN’s fact sheets on uterine fibroids in his piece about elagolix, an oral gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist being studied for the treatment of endometriosis and uterine fibroids.

New York Times

February 2018  | NWHN’s fact sheets on hysterectomies get a shout out from New York Times author Liam Stack, who writes about actress Lena Dunham’s experience getting a hysterectomy after enduring endometriosis.

Women’s Health

January 2018  | NWHN’s Policy Advocacy Director Sarah Christopherson says crisis pregnancy centers “are designed for one purpose—to make sure everyone carries their pregnancy to full term—and they’ll do or say anything to make sure that happens.”